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  • Story Circle: Weaving Culture and Community – Native Arts and Resilience

    When: Thursday, December 3, 3–3:45 p.m. ET
    Where: Streaming online
    Category: Narrative Session
    Accessibility: ASL interpretation, real-time captioning available
    (Left) Hawaiian musician and singer Aaron J. Salā from Honolulu, Hawaiʻi, chants for a hula performance. (Middle) Penobscot basket maker Theresa Secord celebrates with basket weavers from across the United States and the Pacific Rim at Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington. (Right) Alfred “Bud” Lane III of the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians in Oregon teaches his granddaughter Halli to weave a cattail mat. Photos by Kapulani Landgraf, courtesy of Theresa Secord, by Cheryl Lane

    (Left) Hawaiian musician and singer Aaron J. Salā from Honolulu, Hawaiʻi, chants for a hula performance. (Middle) Penobscot basket maker Theresa Secord celebrates with basket weavers from across the United States and the Pacific Rim at Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington. (Right) Alfred “Bud” Lane III of the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians in Oregon teaches his granddaughter Halli to weave a cattail mat. Photos by Kapulani Landgraf, courtesy of Theresa Secord, by Cheryl Lane

    For many Native American communities, resilience has been key to sustaining their diverse cultures and treasured ways of life in the wake of disease, genocide, and other terrible realities wrought by centuries of colonialism and social injustice.

    Join us in conversation with three inspiring Native artists and cultural leaders: Siletz basket maker and language teacher Alfred “Bud” Lane of Oregon, Hawaiian musician and singer Aaron J. Salā of Hawaiʻi, and Penobscot basket maker Theresa Secord of Maine. Together they share the creative ways in which they have met the many challenges posed by the pandemic and reflect on their increased sense of urgency to be “good ancestors,” working tirelessly to pass on their cultural knowledge to younger generations in their communities and taking action to bring about positive change at the institutional level in American society.

    Accessibility

    Real-time captioning (CART) and American Sign Language interpretation will be provided for this program while it’s live. To access, please follow the links below.


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