Skip to main content

In the early evenings, enjoy live music presented inside the National Museum of the American Indian and on the outdoor Four Directions Stage (located on the northern side of the National Mall between Third and Fourth streets).

All concerts are free and open to the public. ASL interpretation and live, real-time captioning will be provided.

This schedule is subject to change due to weather and other factors.

Jump to: June 26 | June 28 | June 29 | | June 30 | July 1


Wednesday, June 26

A group of hula dancers wearing green leis and crowns and gray skirts perform on stage, left arms raised.

4–5 p.m. | Potomac Atrium
Hālau o Kekuhi

The esteemed Hālau o Kekuhi classical dance school elevates Native Hawaiian knowledge and practice through hula and oli (chant). In this performance, they portray the Native Hawaiian saga of Pele, the goddess of volcanoes, and her younger sister, Hiʻiakaikapoliopele, a goddess of regeneration and hula.


Friday, June 28

Eight adults pose in front of an adobe brick wall holding musical instruments: violines, clarinet, double bass, acoustic guitar, horn, small guitar, and drum.

4–5 p.m. | Rasmuson Theater
Pasatono Orquesta

Pasatono Orquesta is dedicated to studying and sharing the Mixtec music of Guerrero, Puebla, and Oaxaca, Mexico, especially the music of village bands, while innovating on their inherited repertoire with modern arrangements and influences.

 
Two men dressed in all black against a black backdrop.

5:30–7 p.m. | Four Directions Stage
First Beats: Indigenous Hip-Hop

Artists from North and South America challenge popular perceptions of “Native music” and hip-hop. The show features brothers Doc Native and Spencer Battiest (Seminole/Choctaw) from the Seminole Tribe of Florida, and Mapuche rapper Waikil with guitarist Ketrafe from Santiago, Chile.


Saturday, June 29

A woman poses wearing woven blue and green top and red necklace.

4–5 p.m. | Rasmuson Theater
Sara Curruchich

Singer-songwriter Sara Curruchich is the first Indigenous Guatemalan artist to sing in Kaqchikel for an international audience. Her songs blend elements of rock, folk, and Maya Kaqchikel traditional music, with marimba, bass, and percussion accompaniment for this performance.

 
Three people wearing masks jump in unison on stage.

5:30–7 p.m. | Four Directions Stage
Pamyua

Described as “Inuit soul,” Pamyua is rooted in Inuit music, dance, and tradition, dynamically reinterpreted with contemporary style by members from Alaska and Greenland.


Sunday, June 30

A person holds a wooden drum beater and an animal-skin drum, smiling slightly. Black-and-white photo.

4–5 p.m. | Rasmuson Theater
Nadia Larcher

Based in Buenos Aires, Nadia Larcher (Diaguita Calchaquí) fuses her Indigenous Argentine roots with modern Latin music through strings, percussion, and her distinctive voice.

 
A woman poses wearing woven blue and green top and red necklace.

5:30–7 p.m. | Four Directions Stage
Sara Curruchich

Singer-songwriter Sara Curruchich is the first Indigenous Guatemalan artist to sing in Kaqchikel for an international audience. Her songs blend elements of rock, folk, and Maya Kaqchikel traditional music, with marimba, bass, and percussion accompaniment for this performance.


Monday, July 1

A group of people in matching denim tops adorned with blue and red ribbons across the chest pose on a rock face.

4–5 p.m. | Potomac Atrium
Sons of Membertou

Representing First Nations in Nova Scotia, Canada, Sons of Membertou present Mi’kmaw music traditions through drum repertoire and the Mi’kmaw language. This concert publicly kicks off a collaboration with the group that will culminate in a future Smithsonian Folkways album.
Presented with Smithsonian Folkways Recordings and the Embassy of Canada to the United States to mark Canada Day.


Support the Folklife Festival, Smithsonian Folkways Recordings, sustainability projects, educational outreach, and more.

.